If I were a Bond Girl

I’d be Thunderball beautiful
Have a body like a smart bomb
Be Jill St. John, Britt Eckland and Barbara Bach
All rolled into one

Dad

By Zoe Brock

Memoir

Death.

It’s a curious thing.

I don’t mean to sound macabre but I’m feeling a bit philosophical and whimsical.

If it’s possible to feel whimsical about things of such a heavy nature.

I’ve had a fair bit of death in my life, and as time passes I’m able to look back on some of it and even giggle.

Of course, most of the time there isn’t very much that’s funny about death at all. Unless you’re reading the Darwin Awards.

Most of the time death is a vicious, sad, horrible and frighteningly inevitable part of life. which means, that on the odd occasion when something is funny about death, I have to seize it and run like a cheetah for all I’m worth.

Laughing in the face of fear is often the only weapon we have to combat it.

Sometimes I wonder if I have a sensitivity chip missing, or if I’m trying to protect myself with humor.

And I think, no, perhaps I’m just a little more twisted than even I give myself credit for.

And I think it’s genetic.

Brocky2


Throughout my life, and his, my old man would joke about how he wanted to be preserved upon his death, a death that occurred in a most untimely fashion a few short years ago in 2001.

He wanted to be stuffed.

Naked.

With an erection.

And used as a coat rack.

I could probably end this story right here but unfortunately there’s much, much more.

Obviously we, his devastated survivors, failed to comply with his wishes. Nor did we bother honoring his alternative desire, cremation, either. I’m not sure why we ended up burying him, but in retrospect I figure that once he was dead we thought he kind of gave up the right to having any involvement in the decision making process.

“Screw him!” We probably thought. “If he’s going to bugger off and die then he doesn’t bloody deserve to get cremated!” or something along those lines.

Revenge of the Living.

And so he’s buried in a beautiful little cemetery in a forest, surrounded by old gold miners and towering trees, with a bottle of Scottish malt and about seventeen joints to keep him occupied.

Seventeen is not nearly enough.

Brocky1

When my father died I needed to say goodbye in my own way.

I spent time with his body and held his cold hands. I stroked his beard and cried a lot. I spoke to him in whispers and wails. I begged and pleaded and asked him questions he’d never have answered in life, let alone death.

And then I painted his nails.

Silver glitter, if you must know.

For old times sake.

It was an overdue apology for asking him to refrain from decorating himself in this manner when I was small.

At the funeral I gave everybody a jar of gold stars to throw down upon him in lieu of Aotearoa’s cold and wintry earth.

We sent him off in a shower of golden rain from above. It was beautiful. And a bit kitsch. And I think he’d have hated it. But that wasn’t his prerogative either anymore, was it?

Dad left behind many a legacy, the least of which was a collection of plastic yogurt pots containing the cremated remains of our family pets.

All of them.

Three dogs and countless cats.

That’s right.

My dead pets are still lurking on a shelf in south central New Zealand.

Waiting for me.

When he was alive my Dad always wanted to find a good use for them, something artistic, something natural. He’d been mulling over the idea of breaking out the old kiln and firing up some pots so he could use the ashes to make glazes, but I was mortified at this suggestion and used my only-daughter routine to shut it down.

And so they sit there still.

And I have no idea what to do about it at all.

My somewhat lackadaisical attitude towards death comes from both sides of my family.

Several Christmases ago I was appalled to open a gift in front of my entire family and discover it was a beautifully wrapped box containing the ashes of my recently deceased companion of twenty years, Baby, my cat who had died while I was overseas traveling.

“Gee. Thanks Mum.” NOT.

For some reason every single family member had also decided to give me a token to memorialize her- a photo, a card, a bit of her hair.

It was quite possibly the most inappropriate and awful Christmas of my life, and I behaved accordingly. It sucked. The intentions were pure, the reaction… nyeh.

Baby’s around here somewhere too.

And I have no bloody idea what to do with her either.

When my grandmother Ainslee died several years ago her funeral service and it’s rather earnest, morose vibe was ruined completely when my cousin Guy took matters into his own hands with regards to the coffin.

As the pallbearers were sliding Ainslee’s boxed remains onto the rollers that gently glide coffins into waiting hearses, young Guy put his hands on the end of the box, yelled “Bye bye Nana!” and gave an almighty shove.

There was quite a racket.

It wasn’t pretty.

Guy proudly smacked his hands together, as if to clean them, and looked mighty pleased with himself. It was a job well done.

It’s hard to get back to concentrated mourning after a scene like that.

I think about death a lot, I guess.

For a few years I was depressed and wanted very much to die.
But not anymore.
Now I’m glad to be alive, and thankful.
But I still think about it and what it means and where we go and if I even care.
I don’t have any answers, and I barely have questions, but I do know this- it’s something I want to experience without fear.
I’d like to be cognizant through my own death, to accept it, to be at peace.

But I suppose that’s a lot to ask for.

I’d also like to be remembered with humor and honesty, much as my old man was at his wake.

“Jeez the old bugger was a bloody bastard.” Someone muttered into his tenth pint of beer. The very same someone who’d traveled halfway across the world to be present at that funny, forlorn little service in a pine forest in the middle of nowhere.

I smiled and sipped my own beer, nodding my head in agreement. It was true. He was a bloody bastard sometimes. But he was a bloody funny, honest, human, loving bastard too, and he was mine.

Wbandzb

Here’s to you daddy. I’m awfully sorry about the damn coat rack not panning out for you, but the neighbors would’ve had a fit, and honestly? I’d’ve had to have kept a blanket over your head to preserve my own sanity.

See you on the other side, and save a joint for me, if you can bear it?

Z


25 Comments »

Comment by Howard |Edit This
2006-09-20 03:42:06

Wow…I’m not sure why, but your image of you with your deceased father really moved me. I suppose in lieu of the no-relationship I had with mine. Somehow, seeing those so full of life, like yourself, stopping and having to deal is a hard image to watch.

And for the record…I’m glad you’re alive. I’m glad you’re here…bringing a bit of color to a world of gray walls.

Comment by st0ker |Edit This
2006-09-20 03:59:13

philosophical – check
whimsical – check

You forgot to mention humourous – Revenge of the Living is a nice one.

And also extremely touching

xoS

Comment by Jon Mahoney |Edit This
2006-09-20 04:14:38

Zoe,
Wow, you are quite the writer. I enjoy reading
what you write very much…striking.
I am 10minutes from DFW airport if you ever fly through

Comment by MTHIOTVOSB |Edit This
2006-09-20 04:29:30

I think Jon Mahoney wants to propose. – You know he’s right about the writer part but even more you are quite the daughter. Cheers! Oh wait! Scratch that!!! I’m sober and I’m out!

Comment by Goddess |Edit This
2006-09-20 06:29:02

Beautiful… found myself thinking a lot of my own dad when I read your piece… trying to imagine how I will deal, and how you did deal… very moving piece.

Loves.
kj

Comment by beau |Edit This
2006-09-20 07:03:34

Rip Dad.

Comment by Glenn |Edit This
2006-09-20 08:54:15

You are an amazing writer.

Comment by Trip |Edit This
2006-09-20 09:25:14

What a beautifully written memorial. Thank you very much for this. Your dad sounds like he was quite the character, I can see where you get your strength and humor! Thank you so much for sharing this, Zoe. Say hi to Owlie for me. -) Kudos!

Comment by Spencer |Edit This
2006-09-20 13:28:08

he didnt want to donate his penis for use in a penis transfer to some poor asian guy who had his cut off?

Comment by Todd Darling |Edit This
2006-09-20 13:33:59

Hey Zoe.

You know – I never met your father – but I’d bet my life he’d be proud of the beautiful person you are.

Todd

Comment by deborah jones |Edit This
2006-09-20 17:09:50

Yes, Todd, I was thinking that too

thankyou Zoe… your story gave me

a whiff of Warwick
welcoming to his home
Hey Deb he’d say,
swiveling on a stool
warm and brotherly

so much love between the two of you

Comment by Joshua |Edit This
2006-09-20 17:39:03

Well done, Zoe. I also lost my father in 2001, June 12 to be exact… right before Father’s Day. It’s a struggle at times. And it’s always the little things, like when I have trouble remembering what his voice sounds like, that make it particularly tough. Anyway, this piece really hits close to home for me. Thank you.

Comment by Becky |Edit This
2006-09-21 09:40:49

Shucks, Zoe.

I wish my dad wanted to be a stuffed-cock coatrack.

I think I’d just like to have my left hand stuffed…holding a cigarette…giving the finger.

It could be a door-knocker.

Big kiss for ya.

2006-09-21 09:43:18

Zoe:

Great work, once again. Also, in regards to the Darwin Awards, a friend of mine, Finn Taylor, just finished a film entitled the Darwin Awards. He took some of those death ideas, melded them together, and came up with an interesting story line.

Hope all’s well…

Comment by 1159 |Edit This
2006-09-21 10:11:46

Dangit Zoe, I wanted to be the first to write about death and existential longing and you went and did it all good too.
Snif.
Your best yet.

Comment by solar |Edit This
2006-09-21 10:12:36

zoita, what would i give to see the two of you in action as your ridiculous selves? well…i’ll wait patiently. and like you, enter into my own death, fearless, with my eyes wide open.

i’m so glad you’re still here.
my love.

2006-09-21 11:17:20

Nicely done. I agree–that picture of the two of you is very touching.

Comment by meg |Edit This
2006-09-21 11:59:15

Crying at work? Not a good idea…

You know how sometimes you worry that no one will ever know how you feel, ever know what the point is?

I don’t even know you and you got it. You pinned it down in an armload of sentences and…thanks.

Comment by Ernie |Edit This
2006-09-21 15:52:17

Wow, Zoe. Very impressive. You always make me laugh or at the very least; feel “something” and you out did yourself with this one.
Best wishes as always.
Speechless, again.

Comment by Anonymous |Edit This
2006-09-21 16:47:39

Baby girl, this was breathtaking. I adore you.

Comment by Lara |Edit This
2006-09-22 09:16:40

Hi Zoe – I gasped at the photograph of your father in the woods. I can’t explain why, but there is something hauntingly beautiful about it within the context of this lovely written remembrance of him.

2006-09-22 16:01:47

You painted your dad’s nails? You are awesome.

Comment by Maureen |Edit This
2006-09-25 13:32:23

Zoe,

First of all I LOVE your name, and I used to use the name Zoe as a moniker when I did a job where anonymity was important.

Yours is the first post I read on this website, and I loved it. I too have had quite an “obsession” with death, feelings ranging from fearing death, wanting death, glamorizing death, accepting death, then realizing I hadn’t accepted the idea of death. But mostly I think death can be really really funny. I love your dad’s idea of a coatrack )

Comment by Angie |Edit This
2006-10-30 07:45:46

This was very beautiful.

After three hellish summers in Madrid, I decided to do something different.

I went back home.

Home is Phillipsburg; Ohio, a suburb of a suburb of Dayton, which is famous for the birthplace of aviation (the Wright brothers grew up here), the Dayton Peace Accords (Serb-Croat conflict) and Guided by Voices.

Here’s a dog story my neighbor told me the other day.

My neighbor’s friend (I’ll call her That Idiot Samsonite Bitch for anonymity’s sake) lives in Manhattan.

That Idiot Samsonite Bitch has a big dog and it dies.

She calls the vet – Do they pick up dead dogs?

Vet says no.

She can’t bury the dog in her yard because she lives in Manhattan.

She doesn’t have a car because she lives in Manhattan.

Manhtn

She puts the dog in a suitcase and boards a city bus headed for the dump.

Maybe, like me, you’re thinking she could have tried another number before going for the suitcase, but she’s not you and she’s not me.

This is an older lady and she’s having trouble lifting the suitcase, when a guy offers to help her.

He asks, What’s in the suitcase that’s so heavy?

Embarrassed, she says, Computer parts, and the guy steals her suitcase.

Here, my neighbor laughs, “Isn’t that classic New York?” and I say “Yes,” but now I want to hear the happy ending.

Maybe I’m still a kid at heart.

I like to see a family of bears get a pesky intruder out of the house, a wayward son return home for a grand celebration, a feuding guitarist reunite with the band for one last show.

I’m thinking That Idiot Samsonite Bitch might break down in remorse, and the dead dog will get proper send-off with the NYPD playing bagpipes.

“And . . . ?” I say. “And what happened next?”

“Oh, she calls the police. They find her suitcase and the dog.”

“And then . . . ?”

“I don’t know and then,” she says. “It’s just a funny story.”

I’m thinking of a hot, dead dog bent in a suitcase and can’t remember the funny part of the story when I ask, “What’s the dog’s name?”

She says, “What?” like now I’m the weird one.

~

My husband, Mr. Henderson, is the type of guy who goes to the pet store and names all the pets.

Once he stopped in the middle of the highway to save a turtle.

If anything has fur on it, he wants to take it home.

We met when we were teenagers.

He was just learning how to reproduce paintings for theatre backdrops.

This is one he did when we first met.

Paintingwhole

He’s kept his old artwork rolled up in a corner at his office, where he’s a professor.

Some days, he brings our new rescued greyhound to his office.

This is Steve:

Steve

Pamela Anderson loves dogs like Steve.

When we got Steve, every vertebrae, rib and hip bone showed.

He has scars all over – some from collisions on the race track and some from sitting too long in a crate.

Until the day we adopted him, he’d never been in a house before.

He never played catch or rode in a car with his head out the window or had someone call him by name.

When you pet him, he leans his head into your stomach like he can’t believe it.

Steve likes Mr. Henderson so much, he whimpers when he’s gone.

Recently, Steve was having a day at the office when Mr. Henderson stepped out to meet with a student.

There was a bit of a panic:

Couchfluff

Officecrash

Remember that painting?

Paintingrip

And then Steve got up on the desk and couldn’t get down again.

~

Steve is learning that when we go away, we come back again.

He’s learning to climb stairs and he’s learning he has a name.

He’s learning not to eat things he finds in the kitchen sink, where he can reach flat-pawed.

He’s learning not to play with Mr. Panda because Mr. Panda belongs to our other dog.

Mrpanda

He’s cool with both of our cats, but we keep a close eye because we don’t want him to mistake them for rabbits.

Bunnies

(I am not a professional artist, though I signed my drawing.)

~

I’ve already told you I like happy endings, so this story has one.

Actually two.

The first happy thing is that ripped paintings practically fit back together like puzzles.

Paintingtogether

And more importantly:

Stevebed

Steve is done with crate sores.