Recent Work By Paula Bomer

Meg Tuite’s novel, Domestic Apparition, challenges the strictures of the novelistic form. One could qualify it as a “novel in stories” or even call it a collection of stories, but by the end of reading it, its cohesiveness and narrative pull firmly place it in the land of the novel, albeit a unique one, both in structure and content—one that perhaps only a small press would publish (and by saying that, I’m applauding small presses everywhere).

“I was vicious with grief.” —Cheryl Strayed

Bellevue Literary Press, who published this excellent, heartbreaking collection of stories, Widow by Michelle Latiolais, specializes in publishing work about mental health or rather, mental illness. Associated with the famous hospital in New York City, it publishes a review as well with the same focus. I had been curious about their titles for some time and reading Widow was a profound experience. That Bellevue, associated with extreme and very apparent cases of mental illness in a number of movies and novels, understands that grief, an experience common to everyone on this planet, is a suffering so strong and life-changing as to make one ill, shows a subtlety and intelligence that should be commended.