Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 4, 2020, 1:10 PM
to Thomas

Hey Man, I thought I’d kick off our conversation if you are ok with that.

When I think about Alone I think it is a very self aware book. I mean the mind beneath the surface of the book comes off as having a clear idea of what it is. It seems to know what it doesn’t know as well. In this way I see it as a book that impacts what it interacts with as opposed to being impacted by it. Conversely, with Come Down To Us, I always pictured the book being like a home movie being projected on a sheet hanging at the dark end of a barn. Drafts make the sheet move and distort the image and light makes it through the roof and blots out portions of the film.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 4, 2020, 3:06 PM
to me

I think that you’re right. Definitely that the book is there and very much ready to collaborate with whoever picks it up, with their imagination or thoughts or whatever. I love how you describe Come Down To Us. It’s an apt scene that you imagine because I always think of your writing as being very visual – I see your books so vividly when I read them. You have a skill of being able to really help or entice the mind into building these super rich scenes – you can feel the damp moss on trees, the weather is always so palpable. Do you have these really strong images appearing to you before you write them – are the ideas born like that? I ask, because I’m very much not a visual writer. For the most part, when I write, it’s the language that occurs to me. I rarely see things and then write about them – the words are just there to be lined up and rearranged.

 

Mark Gluth
Jul 4, 2020, 10:16 PM
That’s interesting about how the words are there for you, I think that gets at what I was saying about how I don’t see Alone being impacted by outside forces. Your writing often has this vibe, a confidence perhaps, where it seems like it considers anything outside of itself as besides the point. That’s something I admire about it for sure. For me, the mood is always the most important thing. Everything beneath it is a hodge podge that serves the goal of conveying that mood. I rewrite everything so much, and I know the drafts are moving in the right direction that when I read them back they cause a vague little film to play in my head.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 5, 2020, 12:27 AM
to me

I mean that the ideas come in words rather than visuals. The first sentence of Alone came first and hovered round in my brain for a while before I started the book – it doesn’t always start like that. But this one sentence appeared out of nowhere without any other context; there was no scene in my head or any notion of anything else. Rather than confidence, I always think that a lot of my writing is about confusion. Maybe because by the time they are finished I’ve messed around with the texts so much and edited so much out, perhaps they are just zipped shut and hermetic or something – maybe that comes across as the confidence you can feel? I dunno. Similar to what you say – I always think in terms of mood – that kind of trumps anything else when I’m writing.

Oh – I mentioned my first sentence, which reminded me that I wanted to ask about yours – that first sentence in Come Down To Us is really something! It’s like this spiralling sensation – straight away it pulls you around and forces you inside the text – it kind of calls for this extra level of attention that I think is really important with your writing in that there always seems to be a lot happening with the sentences. It can be disorientating, which I really enjoy as a reader. Can you talk a little bit about how you started the book like that – is that where it started?

 

Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 6, 2020, 9:46 PM
to Thomas

Well maybe when I say I see confidence, what I mean is a kind of acceptance of the confusion you talk about. And I really love how the book is about confusion. I mean, I see the structure as a representation of confusion in how it jumps through time, location, etc, but the voice of the narrator is so strong that it’s actually him that allows all the disparate elements to cohere. So maybe that’s actually where I see the confidence. And at the same time you kinda infuse this great uneasiness into the book. There’s nothing more unnerving in a confusing situation than for there to be a static counterpoint and within the text I feel there is a sense of stasis as well. I picture it kinda like a cloud where all these internal processes are occurring, and its shifting shape and moving through the air to different places but it’s always the same cloud. But it’s a weird cloud, because where clouds usually hide their internal processes behind a generic surface, I feel your book hides its exterior behind a relentless interior.

Thanks about the opening sentence. I told my friend Chantal it’s like the piece of writing of which I’m most proud. I kinda worked on it alot. And no, it came late in the game. Thinking about the structure of the text, I realized darkness played a big role. Characters disappear into it, it affects change, and is actually a character in a sense. Anyway, I liked the idea of the book starting with a sort of brief prelude. Something that referenced the darkness in the text and which matched the spirit, but which was not directly involved in it. I did something similar in my last book, The Goners. With this I wanted it to be one sentence, and also really convoluted. I wanted it to be complex but in this way that it’s like black ink drawing on black paper so the complexity is apparent but also hidden, ya know? I also kinda pictured it like the opening notes of a perfume, something non linear that is not directly related to what’s subsequent.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 7, 2020, 12:08 PM
to me

I’m really pleased you talked about it being a cloud. I’m always referencing the sky and clouds in my work. And when I think of writing I think of a fog and having to try and feel out a shape in the dark – that’s kind of how I imagine things when I’m editing. Working out what this fog or mess is meant to be and then honing it down till the actual shape reveals itself. You’ve articulated things way better than I could with the thing about hiding its exterior behind a relentless interior. I kind of want the skin of the book to be this really dominant thing that’s kind of also doing an impression of something else and keeping all the internal tricks hidden.

Thinking about the Goners which you mention and this new book I wanted to ask you about how you think about characters. For me, in your writing, the characters are sometimes almost secondary to the bond between the characters – like they eventually get extinguished or engulfed by the feelings that are there that are ultimately bigger than them – or it makes it seem like the characters are there but they’re tricks of the light or something – a result of something much bigger than themselves. Not saying that they aren’t beautifully rendered, I mean … but – I dunno, can you talk about the idea of characters – are they important to you? I have my own ideas about how I used the notion of character in mine, and I don’t see them being that important in the scheme of things but I want to know how you view them?

 

Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 7, 2020, 9:21 PM
to Thomas

Oh cool. Yeah I don’t think I’ve ever read a book that does an interior thing the way you do it in Alone. Was that by design? You mention editing out a lot of stuff, was there more exterior stuff you got rid of? If so you have top notch editing instincts Speaking of which can we talk about length? I guessed Alone is like 20,000 words. I bring this up because I feel different writers have different word counts that work best for them, based on their style etc… Like I feel for myself I would really need to make a case for anything north of 27,000, but 18,000 – 21,000 could be more ideal? Anyway, knowing your work and stuff, I feel a more concentrated text works best.

I really love what you said about the characters in my books coming off like tricks of the light. I never thought about how the bonds between my characters are more primary than the characters. But I see it. Honestly for me the main thing in writing a book is capturing the initial idea, and working towards the platonic ideal of it and chasing that as the idea flexes and develops during my writing the book. Everything else is a component of that goal. So a character’s existence is as important as an inanimate object. Honestly the overall shape of the narrative is probably way more important than any person in the narrative. For whatever reason the two main characters in the CDTU are like the vaguest I’ve had in any of my books. I kinda pictured writing more conventional characters and then applying a filter to them that removed all but the most extreme emotions. I dunno if it works, but I wanted them to only really feel bliss and contentment on one end then fear and depression and rage on the other.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 8, 2020, 1:44 PM
to me

Yeah it’s intentional. Well, I think I need to preface anything I say about how my works by really saying that I write because I feel compelled to do so. I don’t know where that compulsion comes from and I don’t think I particularly need to – I’m just glad that I do. I just have this urge or need or whatever that’s overwhelming. And so basically, that’s why I write – it’s a compulsion and a need and that’s about it. Writing doesn’t always make me feel better but I know that I definitely feel worse if I don’t write. Obviously within that I know that I make formal decisions about the writing that I do and there are certainly some decisions that are conscious. It’s hard to fully describe because a lot of it is intuitive but yeah, that stuff you talk about was definitely by design. I like the idea of having a kind of hyper emotional appearance to parts of the exterior of the writing that kind of forces attention in certain ways while the internal stuff is playing a few more tricks that make this weird vibe or tension or whatever.

In terms of editing my stuff definitely fits a more concentrated text. With Alone and In Their Arms, both books were probably about double the length before I edited. I cut about half out. I just went with what the books felt like they needed and snipped away pretty heavily.

I love and relate to what you just said about characters’ existence being as important as an inanimate object. I get that, completely. It’s all about serving the idea – that’s what’s paramount.

 

Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 11, 2020, 10:08 PM
to Thomas

Yeah man, I totally get it about writing coming from a need. Two different ways I think about my writing are 1) like a child scribbling on a piece of paper and 2) as a form of organized daydreaming, and in both of those metaphors they are things I can’t control, you know? I’m more and more hesitant to attempt to understand my process, or intellectualize it because I just feel the truth is past any concepts or whatever. So it’s kinda hilarious, our conversation here, because that’s kinda what I’m doing. But I love gaining insights into other artists’ work, so….I guess I have to share if I want you to share.

It’s great how you said you like having this hyper emotional appearance beneath which there’s like a hidden machinery or whatever. Playing into that, I like how your language has a kind of chattiness to it, a kinda matter of fact vibe. It’s even more so in Alone, kinda like that narrator is speaking to someone that is separate from himself, but also kind of within him. I guess that might be what you mean by “internal stuff”.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 12, 2020, 6:12 AM
to me

“I’m more and more hesitant to attempt to understand my process, or intellectualize it because I just feel the truth is past any concepts or whatever.” Exactly! I think it would be wrong to be able to find the exact source that the writing comes from. If I could do that then why wouldn’t I just write an essay? Obviously we’re artists who are working with words and the words are everything given that it’s our tool but they’re also completely incidental, almost irrelevant in how I think about the heart of the idea. The words are just there to try and hang the ideas upon or something like that.

Yeah – I guess there is a chattiness to Alone. Hmmm … I suppose a book is a collaboration between the writer and then the different imaginations that it comes into contact with, right? So maybe that collaboration is more obvious this time, I dunno? I think it feels like a book that very much operates on the fact that it is a book. The skin of the book is very obviously there to be read.

That makes me think – where is the reader in regards to your stuff, in your opinion? With all of your books, which I’ve devoured usually in one sitting or at the very most two and then gone through them again thinking how the fuck has he done that?!? A feeling that I’ve got from The Late Work of Margaret Kroftis right the way through to and especially with Come Down To Us is that the writing is so tightly mapped and weighted out – there’s a very meticulous balancing of the prose it seems – that there isn’t that much room for the reader, as in – the ideas have been rendered so faithfully and realised to sharply by yourself, that the reader just has to read it and let it crash over them in waves – they’re gonna feel the storm that’s there – they don’t need to help create it.

 

Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 12, 2020, 9:09 PM
to Thomas

Yes! The words are completely incidental. Like….. I feel like a lot of times my writing is a map that represents a mind, the mind being the idea and the map being kinda paltry and little more than a decorative thing. But at the same time it’s the best I can do, you know? But that’s just how our world is at this moment. In some other version of our universe the technology for portraying the idea and the methods for implementing the technology could be so different.

I honestly, and not to sound smug, never think about a reader with regards to my books. I spend like 4 years on a book, and if I’m being honest every chapter gets rewritten at least 50 times and by the end of the writing process I have the book whittled into a machine that causes the idea to bloom for me, in a very precise way, when I read it. So at that moment, right before I decide a book is finished….during that final reading of the text….that’s the moment the books are for, with me as the reader. Earlier when you talked about my writing being visual….maybe I got that a bit more now. I really see my books as being sculptures made out of words, and a sculpture is not something one usually enters. Hence the absence of space for a reader in my books.

So where do you see the reader in your work? I often see the reader almost as someone to whom the book is being read while at the same, in particular with your haiku, the act of being read to is kind of like a spell that causes the reader to wear a sort of costume triggered by your words.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 13, 2020, 3:34 PM
to me

I very much think in terms of the whole piece of writing being a sculpture as well – precisely that. So we definitely have that in common. I guess the way mine are designed they very much know they are books – and this is where language fails me because I can’t quite explain what I mean by that even though it feels very true. Not that them “knowing” is meant to imply that they take on lives of their own – they’re definitely sculptures that are arranged and hung together in intricate and purposeful ways. The reader is there when the book is finished, I suppose.

On 13 Jul 2020, at 05:09, Mark Gluth <[email protected]> wrote:

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Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 15, 2020, 7:01 PM
to Thomas

I totally get not being able to put into language why a text is a book, it’s just a feeling or a mood for me. Anyway, change of course, can I ask you about influences? I know lots of writers talk about mimicking specific writers to understand the mechanics or whatever of their books. I never did anything like. I feel like I fumble but also I don’t understand how my books work and I believe understanding how, say Play It As It Lays works would cause me to view my work in a different light, and I find that idea abhorrent.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 18, 2020, 6:28 AM
to me

Influences … I suppose there are some things that impact you at the start, when you’re very first writing and then stay with you forever. Certain things get into your blood and are always there. And then there are specific other things that come into the orbit of each individual project – new stuff adding to the pile or whatever. With this particular book, off the top of my head I was interested in looking at stuff like Donna Hunnca’s art, Catherine Briellat’s films maybe, some of Sarah Kane’s plays, some of Loren Connor’s albums, early Sonic Youth, the latest Body/Head album. How about you? I know that music plays a big part with your stuff – I always think of black metal when I think of your work, even though I know you have very wide ranging tastes. Do you listen to music when you write?

 

Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 20, 2020, 7:32 PM
to Thomas

Yeah, I totally get the work related delay thing!

I think I agree that stuff stays with you from the initial. At the same time I’m always trying to self consciously be open to new influences. Like I don’t want to be 70 and making the same art I did when I was 30. Who would want or need that? But yeah, my writing is always going to have whatever hallmarks that signify “me” in a writing sense.

Yeah I listen to music while I’m writing. Sometimes I see ways where it really directly influences the work, other times I feel like it has as much influence as the air I was breathing when I wrote, ya know? But yeah, I need music, music that has a mood that meshes with either my mood or something in the text. Of late I guess my biggest influence was the composer Morton Feldman, I feel like his work features abstraction really strongly whilst at the same time revealing and referencing the girders upon which it’s surface is propped. Plus he has this great mood. So genius. And like, well the book is named after a Burial track and again, his work has this great mood, and I love how he plays with structure in his work. But I listen to all kinds of stuff. My writing playlist of individual tracks is over 26 hours long. I usually just have it play on shuffle.

So I have this idea you listen to Xiu Xiu while writing, possibly because I saw a post on Instragram where you were listening to Xiu Xiu while writing. They are totally genius, I love those three videos they made from their last album.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 20, 2020, 11:53 PM
to me

Yeah – I feel like I should correct myself or rather expand, as I meant to say that you have the influences that hit you early on and make that initial mark, and then there are the things that keep on coming. I kind of have an obsession with finding new art in all mediums. It’s kind of vital to me. And yeah, I think the worst thing is to be someone who says “things were better in my day”. A big part of my outlook when it comes to art is that the best is yet to come. I kind of enjoy that because of the internet and how it makes things so infinite and spread out, that the search for say, new bands or music has to be a very active pursuit – I enjoy that – you have to search for it but if you do you will find exciting new stuff. Outside of writing I don’t like to do that much other than wander round galleries, listen to music and read or watch films – I mean, apart from seeing friends, art is everything to me.

Morton Feldman’s stuff is amazing – I totally concur. Rothko Chapels is one of the most perfect pieces. The mood of his stuff is engulfing. I’ll go listen to that Burial song – I like a lot of his stuff.

Yeah, I’m always listening to Xiu Xiu. They’re pretty much my favourite contemporary band of the last ten years or so. I love everything they put out. They’re something special, for sure. Similar to yourself I listen to a lot of different stuff when I write. A lot of the time it has to be stuff without lyrics or maybe where the lyrics aren’t at the forefront of it. Lots of drone and shoegaze and noise and experimental stuff.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 21, 2020, 5:43 AM
to me

Oh and sorry to reply before you have had a chance ..

Talking of Morton Feldman – please talk to me about A Crippled Symmetry, your collaboration with Steven Purtill. I’ve worked with Steven myself, of course, and he’s such a fantastic artist and a pleasure to work with. Can you talk to me about your artistic experiences with him, please?

On 21 Jul 2020, at 03:32, Mark Gluth <[email protected]> wrote:

 

Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 22, 2020, 8:28 PM
to Thomas

Dude, I never once thought you were voicing a conservative view regarding your writing. I mean your writing is this fluctuating and pulsating and most importantly changing thing, and that just doesn’t jibe with a conservative point of view. Having said that, sure, there’s a core to all of us, a sort of essence that is both malleable and constant, and I thought that was kinda what you were getting at.

Dude, Steven is so rad. He’s an amazing artist and collaborator, as I’m sure you are aware. You know I’m lucky in that he and I both live in Bellingham so we usually talk through stuff in person, then go off and do our work separately and then reconvene. That sort of process is on hold obviously as Washington is still basically shut down. We have an as of yet unreleased audio project where I read and he messes with my voice and then creates these awesome sonic backdrops that seem static but evolve and decay and stuff. We are both super proud of it. Anyway, usually I respond to something he did, or I give him some writing and he comes with stuff. For Crippled Symmetry I think I gave him some writing, then he came up with images and I wrote some stuff based on them. Thing is, he and I share so many preferences in art that our stuff seems to fit together really easily.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 23, 2020, 12:44 AM
to me

Steven is great. We worked similarly when we collaborated, although it was by email and over a longer period of time in between and alongside other projects – reacting and responding to pieces that the other one made.

How is the lockdown where you are now? I don’t want to sound so obvious but I suppose looking back from some point in the future it might be interesting to reference. How have you coped during the quarantine? Have you written? And how often do you write? Is it something that you’re always doing or do you have periods when you’re not writing?

On 23 Jul 2020, at 04:29, Mark Gluth <[email protected]> wrote:

 

Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 25, 2020, 8:32 PM (12 days ago)
to Thomas

Yeah, honestly aside from having coffee from Steven, it seems like our processes have been the same-ish. Maybe that speaks to some inherent similarity in how the three of us function creatively? I mean my own writing is an ebbing and flowing reaction to what I’ve already written.

The lockdown is what it is. I work from home, all via videoconference and Slack and stuff. My partner is an essential employee, and is under a ton of stress as you can imagine. I’m trying to write, and I try to write every day. But somehow the vibe out there in the world is somehow slowing me down. And honestly with Erin going out in the world and dealing with shit probably impacts me. But we move forward, it’s inevitable right? I’m writing a trippy book about religion. One bright light on the horizon is that the women’s basketball season started today, and basketball is a huge hobby of ours. It gives us something to look forward to. That segues to asking you about non writing interests of yours, do you do anything outside of creative activity that recharges you?

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 26, 2020, 6:42 AM (11 days ago)
to me

I’m sorry to hear that your partner is under such stress. It’s such a bizarre time at the moment.

Yes, I’ve seen on your instagram about your love of basketball. For me … outside of writing, I guess it’s just art. All the time. Books, music, films … I usually spend a lot of time wandering round galleries and keeping up with visual art as much as I can. That’s a huge thing to me, and something that I am really missing at the moment.

 

Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Jul 26, 2020, 8:29 PM (11 days ago)
to Thomas

Thanks man. I know you sent me the picture of you wearing a mask on the way to work, so does your job put you in contact with the public? If so does that impact you in any way? And if not, do you still feel any impact from Covid19 on your writing? I wish I could lie and say it’s not impacting me, but I just feel more tentative and hesitant.

Dude, as you know I was in the UK last September, and I’m totally jealous of the number of galleries and museums and stuff. I live in a fairly small town in the middle of a fairly rural area and that access to culture just really isn’t available. But I did watch 7 basketball games in the last 2 days so that’s something.

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 27, 2020, 12:19 PM (10 days ago)
to me

I was able to work from home a fair amount at the start of the lockdown, and then recently I’ve been in and out of work with my mask on during the commute. I’ve kind of felt fairly calm really. I dunno. I’m kind of calm a lot of the time, in general. I don’t know how to work out what impact Covid 19 has had on my writing. I certainly ended up having more time to write than I usually have, which was obviously cool – and I was able to write because I have this kind of very strict discipline that I have forced upon myself for so long now that I very much value any writing time I have. Although I feel insensitive saying that seeing how so many people have really suffered during the whole thing, you know? I’m very aware that I’ve been lucky.

Despite the slow down, it’s exciting to hear that you are writing something new – especially something that sounds so interesting. When did you start working on it? I have to say that I love seeing photos of your drafts, by the way. I love all the handwritten notes and crossings out over the top – they look like works of art to me, seriously. Do you always edit by hand?

 

Mark Gluth
Jul 27, 2020, 9:07 PM (10 days ago)
Oh man that’s so cool that you’re of calm temperament. I’m like the opposite. nearly constantly not calm. I’m so jealous. Seriously though one thing all this quarantine stuff did was cause me to lose my discipline. I think I felt I had all this time in front of me that it became easier to waste it, you know? Or I mean you don’t since obviously you’ve been a busier bee than moi.

Yeah I edit by hand, and I write by hand. So I write a bit, type it up, print it , edit it by hand, type it up, and so on. The books go by way of this process. Thanks so much for the compliment about how the pages in progress look. I mean, I don’t see it but … yeah, cool.

The book will be called How We Rise, How We Never Fall. I’ve been writing it for years, it’s actually something I started before Come Down To Us, but then I paused it to work on GIANT with Michael and then Come Down To Us. Anyway, it involves a cult. and a young woman as she interacts with it as a member. I want it to be about transcendence. It’s kinda inspired by Hildegard von Bingen, but also I see it existing in like the early 70s at the same time. I want it to have a women’s college vibe. It also shares a character with No Other.

But way more interesting to me is all this writing you are doing, so do dish please!

 

Thomas Moore
Jul 29, 2020, 6:46 AM (8 days ago)
to me

No, I don’t think there’s no reason to beat yourself up for not using the time. The whole weirdness of the situation is enough to make people just stop – how do you get your head around it, you know? Also, I think it can be healthy to stop sometimes if you can.

Ha, I wondered if you would see the beauty in your manuscript revisions or not. Trust me – they look very cool. Have you ever seen Pierre Gutotat’s manuscripts? Writing, crossings out, scribbles everywhere – again, I think they’re gorgeous. I saw them in an exhibition a couple of years back.

Your new novel sounds fascinating. As does GIANT. For the sake of the interview I should say that full disclosure – we have both been published by Kiddiepunk and have long standing friendships with Michael – but seriously, I can’t wait for your film. I saw the short film that you wrote and he made and that was great. I can’t wait for the feature length. You both seem like ideal collaborators – your styles click together so well.

With me, I’m in the early stages of a new novel. There is usually a bit more time in between finishing a novel and starting for me but for some reason this one has just jumped out of nowhere so I’m letting it happen and I’ll see where it goes. I finished Alone just before the end of 2019, like right before New Years Eve, and then started this new one in April – so it’s only four months. It feels very different though – the ideas are wanting to pull in a different direction, I guess. And it’s the ideas that decide.

 

Mark Gluth <[email protected]>
Aug 2, 2020, 8:42 PM (4 days ago)
to Thomas

Man I’ve never seen Guyotat’s manuscripts, but now I have to look. Have you ever seen Dennis Cooper’s pages? They kinda look like mine but up until Guide were written on a typewriter with a missing key I think he told me. But by “look like mine” I mean the handwritten additions and edits are all over the place. You write all on a computer right? Do you want to speak to what that’s like for you? Not to get overly nerdy but I recently switched to a Chromebook as my computer and I do all my typing in a plain text editor, like what one might use for coding and stuff. I find the plainness of it very open to me. I also like that my writing is not in some proprietary file format, and can be opened on like any computer ever.

Thanks man, yeah I love collaborating with Michael. I feel we have the same sense of mood in our work. Like that there is always something terrible imminent. I dunno how to say it but yeah. I feel we are a good fit. I feel like he and I eschew explanation as well, and try to mine the sense of the unknown at the expense of the known..

Dude, an idea emerging and charging forward is the best feeling ever. And yes, it is the ideas that decide.

 

Thomas Moore
Aug 3, 2020, 3:24 AM (3 days ago)
to me

Yeah – Dennis Cooper’s manuscripts and notes all look incredible, too. I find scribbles and crossings outs all so beautiful. Yeah, I write on my laptop. If I’m out and about I sometimes make notes on my iPhone. I used to carry notebooks around always, but I can’t remember the last time I wrote anything creative by hand. My handwriting is terrible, so it’s probably no real loss.

I can see that about yours and Michael’s work – that looming sense of incomprehensible dread. Totally. The ideas know so much more than we do.

 

 


Thomas Moore’s first two novels, A Certain Kind of Light (2013) and In Their Arms (2016) were published by Rebel Satori. His novella, GRAVES (2011), and three books of poems, The Night Is An Empire (2013), Skeleton Costumes (2015) and When People Die (2018), were published by Kiddiepunk. His third novel, Alone (2020) was published by Amphetamine Sulphate.

 

Mark Gluth lives in Bellingham, Washington with his wife and their 2 dogs. His most recent works are the novel No Other and the story collection The Goners.

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