“A river bends because it has no choice. This is how it is for brothers at war.” –excerpt, J.A. Tyler’s Variations of a Brother War

Variations of a Brother War is a multifaceted tale about the irreparable damage battlefield atrocities have on two brothers who return to the home front only to find themselves warring over the same woman. Similar to the conflict outlined in Jim Harrison’s Legends of the Fall, J.A. Tyler has engineered a stunning formula for conflict, presenting the tragic breakdown of familial and romantic relationships amidst the raw chaos of war.

Marc Schuster has and will continue to hold a high place on my shelf. His debut novel The Singular Exploits of Wonder Mom and Party Girl wowed me to such such an extent that it became a catalyst of inspiration for my own writing. His literary abilities are phenomenal. He follows the rules when it comes to scene setting and character introductions, but maintains narrative originality so his prose is never stiff or forced. His writing style is dark but down to earth, silly but practical, and smart and hilarious all at once. I’ve been holding my breath for his sophomore novel, The Grievers, released in May, 2012 through The Permanent Press, and I can say with definitive certainty that Schuster has written another boundary-leaping novel.

Please explain what just happened.

I just got off work, I ate a breakfast taco, and went to the bathroom.

 

What is your earliest memory?

I was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. My family and I lived in a basement apartment for a few years, and I remember having a dream that Darth Vader walked into my bedroom. I don’t remember if anything interesting happened after that, though. Another early memory from those years, living in the basement, was a time where we climbed an enormous fence, at the end of our block, to get to McDonald’s. A couple of years ago I asked my parents if they remember that and they said there was no enormous fence there. Haha. I’ve always had a pretty adventurous imagination I suppose.

TheNervousBreakdown.com, which shares fiction, essays and poetry with more than 50,000 readers every month, is now offering book reviews

LOS ANGELES, Calif. (February 2010) – The Nervous Breakdown (TNB) has built a devoted following of over 50,000 unique readers per month since launching a brand new design with expanded content and functionality on November 15th, 2009.

Since then, the site has featured work and “self-interviews” by celebrated authors such as Stuart Dybek, Stephen Elliott, and Jami Attenberg, and by celebrities such as comedian Margaret Cho and radio personality Karith Foster.