When he isn’t greeting people or performing other duties, one of the doormen in our Manhattan apartment building often sits at the front desk with a well-worn book open to a familiar page.  I presume it’s a familiar page because it’s always the same book, always the Christian Bible.

In 3000 BCE, papyrus scrolls allowed people to preserve oral stories in writing. Then, about 2000 years ago, people figured out that they could fold a scroll up into a codex, or even produce individual sheets of paper that could be bound into a book.

Around 1439 CE, Gutenberg’s movable type printing allowed people to reproduce books for the masses.

By the late 1800s, paperbacks were finding themselves in the most remote locations of the world. Books were more available to the general public than ever, but these books were still written as though the stories within them were consistent, straightforward narratives–oral stories on paper.