What’s the most common mistake authors make before their book launches?

M.J.:  Not investing enough of the advance back into the book or investing in the wrong things.  At least once a week I get a panicked call from an author who spent her whole budget on PR and a website and now has a gorgeous page and no press.  No matter how great a publicist is you are still paying for effort.  And there’s no guarantee you will get press.  Press is about news.  Not about quality.  My rule of thumb is for every dollar you spend on PR spend $3-$5 on marketing because marketing is guaranteed.  If you split the budget and the PR works – great – you got press and marketing.  If the PR doesn’t then at least you got your ads.  As for the website – no one goes to Google and types in show me a website I’ve never seen for a book I’ve never heard of.  Your site is mostly for readers who already love you and want to see what else you’ve written.  In the beginning – simple is fine – if they’ve heard about the book and want to know more – a pic of you, a cover, an excerpt, review, buy buttons are great.  And please please before you hire anyone – get references.

Dipping Your Toes in Social Media

Social media is here and it’s likely that using it will increase your chances of being read. You don’t have to do it. No one will hold a gun to your head. However, at the very least put your toe in the water and try it before eschewing it.

First, learn what you like in social media. When speaking with other authors we often hear: “I hate Twitter.” “Facebook is stupid.” “I don’t want to blog.” “I don’t have time for this.” Try a different approach. What can you enjoy doing in the world of social media? Who do you want to be online? Who do you want your potential readers to see? How can you craft that person? (For instance, Randy likes giving advice, researching, and being a know-it-all. Voila, her social media persona.

“Were I called on to define, very briefly, the term Art, I should call it the reproduction of what the Senses perceive in Nature through the veil of the soul.” —Edgar Allan Poe

 

Twenty Years Ago

 

Time played tricks on him whenever he stood in front of the easel. Hypnotized by the rhythm of the brush on the canvas, by one color merging into another, the two shades creating a third, the third melting into a fourth, he was lulled into a state of single-minded consciousness focused only on the image emerging. Immersed in the act of painting, he forgot obligations, missed classes, didn’t remember to eat or to drink or look at the clock. This was why, at 5:25 that Friday evening, Lucian Glass was rushing down the urine-stinking steps to the gloomy subway platform when he should have already been uptown where Solange Jacobs was waiting for him at her father’s framing gallery. Together, they planned to walk over to an exhibit a block away, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

I have two jobs. Half the time I’m an author and the other half I run Authorbuzz.com –- the first marketing company for authors. Having a split personality of sorts, the marketer me is thrilled for the opportunity to interview the author me.

 

Marketer: What aspect of being an author do you love the most?

Author: The disappearing act. One second I’m me sitting down -– the next I’m gone and then a few hours later I come to.