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NICK ANTOSCA:  Okay, normally they do self-interviews here, where the author just interviews him- or herself.  But I didn’t want to do that, so in this case two authors are going to interview each other. We both have books out.  Mine is The Girlfriend Game, a collection of stories which came out last month.  Yours is Threats, a novel which came out last year and was nominated for the PEN/Faulkner.  We both live in Los Angeles.  We both moved here in the last few years.

It seems like a lot of writers are moving out here.  I came because I wanted to write for TV.  Why did you come?  A disproportionate number of serial killers have lived in Southern California.  Why do you think that is?

Nick Antosca’s writing is not ground-breaking or earth-shattering or off-the-charts or any other cliché moniker that you can think of, but it is gobs of fun, and isn’t that all that we want sometimes?

Published earlier this year by Lazy Fascist Press, The Obese is a slim book consisting of two stories: “The Obese”, in which obese people become sick with a zombie-like disease that makes them desperately want to eat people, and “Predator Bait”, a story where a young woman poses as the bait for one of those cover-up shows that entices pedophiles to meet face-to-face with their victims, only to be busted by a self-assured emcee and his camera crew, and later, by a swat team. And while these stories don’t necessarily bring up new concepts or ideas, the fun fact is: what Antosca does with these kernels is build two stories that are quirky, fast-paced, and fun to read.

Is anything “real” in Lars Iyer’s Spurious? Is any element of the narrative or environment more than a manifestation of the existential anxieties of the novel’s first-person protagonist, also named Lars, whose cruel and slightly more successful friend W. relentless taunts and berates him, and whose horrible apartment is being slowly overcome by “the damp”?