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Jillian Lauren first caught my eye at a book launch party in Downtown Los Angeles. A mutual acquaintance introduced us, and the next thing I knew, we were in deep conversation about living and writing in LA, adoption, marriage and interfaith families. I felt an immediate kinship. Raised Jewish by a mother who had converted, I resonated with her story of adoption into a Jewish family and then marrying a Christian guy. The next day I told my sister in Chicago about our talk. She sensed my affinity for Jillian’s story and sent me her memoir.

Unless your name is Axl Rose, then ten years is a hell of a long time to get something done. In fact, most people can accomplish terrific feats of mind and body in well under a decade. Hell, with only eight years, US presidents have repainted the entire cultural landscape of the planet. But if you’re not in a hurry and you don’t mind waiting for the right moment to find you, then ten years is perfect.

In 2001, Ohio-born Scott Shriner stepped into the job as Weezer’s bass player—a position he has comfortably helmed for six of the band’s nine albums, through the present day. With followers whose fervor rivals that of Southern snake handling cults, this is officially a “high-profile gig” and with a steady diet of touring and albums over the past ten years, Shriner hasn’t spent a great deal of time surfing QVC. Until lately.

 
 

The Nervous Breakdown’s Literary Experience. Video by Jason Upright. Recorded on Saturday, November 13th, 2010 at The Echo in Echo Park. Los Angeles, California.

A performance of “People Who Died,” by The Jim Carroll Band.

Scott Shriner (Weezer) – bass, Ray Hartman (Liars, Inc.) – guitar, Dave Brotherton (Project 86) – drums, Jeremy White (The Blessings) – vocals, Lantz L’Amour (CMMF) – guitar/vocals.