Kim Brooks PhotoSo what should people know about you, Kim Brooks?

That’s really hard. What should they know about me? … Wait, why should they know about me?

 

Because you wrote a book. You want people to read that book. And people these days are interested in knowing about the people who write their books. It’s a spiritual value added tax.

Ah, okay. I see. Um, I’m a genius.

 

Yes, keep going.

I write.

 

Yes, very good.

I write fiction, non-fiction…

 

Poetry?

Come on.

 

Why, what’s wrong with poetry?

Nothing, of course. But I can’t do everything. I have kids. A puppy.

 

Couldn’t you get your kids to do it for you? I don’t think poetry is covered under child-labor laws.

I’ll think about it. They do seem very excited that mom has written a book.

 

Is mom excited that she’s written a book?

You know what? I am. I think having written a book beats the hell out of writing one.

 

Yeah, that was a pretty long stretch. What was it? Six years?

Something like that.

 

What took so long?

What took so long? Have you ever invented a world? Made something from nothing?

 

Yes, I have. I’m you. But why don’t you tell the people out there what it’s like?

It’s really fucking hard.

 

Why’d you do it then?

Eh, what else was I going to do?

 

You did drop out of nursing school. The world needs nurses.

This is true, but I would have been a terrible nurse. I would have killed so many people.

 

So, so many.

The suffering would have been incalculable. I’m clumsy, forgetful, imprecise, impatient, easily distracted, queasy, self-involved, prone to panic, and gossipy.

 

There is no malpractice coverage that would have saved you.

Exactly. So in a way, writing this novel saved countless lives.

 

Congratulations.

Thank you.

 

So at long last, tell us about the book.

It’s called The Houseguest. It’s about a group of American Jews on the eve of America’s entrance into World War II. There’s a rabbi with an overactive conscience, some militants, a junkman who sees ghosts, a burned synagogue, and a refugee who claims to be the last great diva of Europe’s Yiddish stage. It’s about the problem of caring, of giving a shit about people you don’t know personally and might never know, and trying to figure out how to feel human and not go crazy even though most of us are pretty fucking powerless, then and now.

 

Sounds dark.

What did you expect?

 

From you, nothing else, now that I think about it.

____________________

KIM BROOKS’ first novel, The Houseguest, is now available from Counterpoint Press. Her memoir, Small Animals: A Memoir of Parenthood and Fear, will be published in 2017 by Flatiron Books/ Macmillan. Her stories have appeared in Glimmer Train, One Story, Five Chapters and other journals and her essays have appeared in Salon, New York Magazine, and Buzzfeed. She lives in Chicago with her husband and children.

TAGS: , , , ,

TNB FICTION is proud to showcase book excerpts and original short fiction from some of the finest writers in the world. Features have included work by Aimee Bender, Dan Chaon, Stuart Dybek, Jennifer Egan, Bret Easton Ellis, Roxane Gay, Etgar Keret, Antonya Nelson, and hundreds of other internationally acclaimed and emerging writers. Spotlighting a recent book release each week, TNB Fiction helps bring awareness of new literary fiction, from both trade and independent publishers, to readers around the world, providing a global, free-access arena for spotlighting the genre in an era of shrinking coverage among mainstream print publications. TNB Fiction has its finger on the pulse of a vibrant new generation of writers, as well as established literary greats whose work continues to shape the future dialogue of literary culture. Fiction Editor Rachael Warecki lives in Los Angeles. Her work has appeared in The Los Angeles Review, The Masters Review, Midwestern Gothic, and elsewhere, and has received residency invitations from the Wellstone Center and Ragdale. She holds an MFA in Fiction from Antioch University Los Angeles and is currently at work on a novel.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *