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Available from William Morrow

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From the critically acclaimed author of The Heap, a thought-provoking and wryly funny novel—equal parts satire and psychological thriller—that holds a funhouse mirror to the isolated workplace and an age of endless distraction.

At the far reaches of the world, the Northern Institute sits in a vast expanse of ice and snow. Once a thriving research facility, its operations were abruptly shut down after an unspecified incident, and its research teams promptly evacuated. Now it’s home to a team of three caretakers—Gibbs, Cline, and their supervisor, Hart—and a single remaining researcher named Gilroy, who is feverishly studying the sensation of coldness.

Their objective is simple: occupy the space, complete their weekly tasks, and keep the building in working order in case research ever resumes. (Also: never touch the thermostat. Also: never, ever go outside.) The work isn’t thrilling—test every door for excessive creaking, sit on every chair to ensure its structural integrity—but for Hart, it’s the opportunity of a lifetime, a chance to hone his leadership skills and become the beacon of efficiency he always knew he could be.

There’s just one obstacle standing in his way: a mysterious object that has appeared out in the snow. Gibbs and Cline are mesmerized. They can’t discern its exact shape and color, nor if it’s moving or fixed in place. But it is there. Isn’t it?

Whatever it might be, Hart thinks the thing in the snow is an unwelcome distraction, and probably a huge waste of time. Though, come to think of it, time itself has been a bit wonky lately. Weekends pass in a blur, and he can hardly tell day from night. Gravity seems less-than-reliable. The lights have been flickering weirdly, and he feels an odd thrumming sensation in his beard. Gibbs might be plotting to unseat him as supervisor, and Gilroy—well, what is he really doing anyway?

Perplexed and isolated—but most certainly not alone—Hart wrestles for control of his own psyche as the thing in the snow beguiles his team, upends their work, and challenges their every notion of what is normal.

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3 responses to “January: 
The Thing in the Snow, by Sean Adams”

  1. Chloe Jolie Trudel is an internationally recognized tennis player, who is considered one of the most gifted players in her age group. Chloe began playing tennis at age four and has been a avid fan ever since. You can find her various online profiles, such as facebook, twitter, instagram and google+. From there you can read about her success in sports and see the pictures she posts on her various sites.

  2. Chloe Jolie Trudel is an internationally recognized tennis player, who is considered one of the most gifted players in her age group. Chloe began playing tennis at age four and has been a avid fan ever since. You can find her various online profiles, such as facebook, twitter, instagram and google.

  3. George Saunders was an American fiction writer and essayist. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 2014 for his short story collection, Tenth of December, which is set in the near future. He’s suggested that in the future, people will no longer pay attention to virtually anything that has nothing to do with their survival or comfort.

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